Underwriting Matters

February 12th, 2020 by admin

Myth: Only those who are in a special flood hazard area can buy flood insurance.
Fact: Flood insurance can be purchased by anyone who lives in a participating community, which must enforce floodplain ordinances and building requirements that meet or exceed FEMA guidelines.

Myth: It doesn’t make sense to pay for flood insurance if you are in a low-risk flood zone.
Fact: People outside of high-risk flood zones file more than 20% of all NFIP claims and receive one-third of the federal disaster assistance for flooding.

Myth: I live in the desert, away from water. I don’t need to worry about flooding.
Fact: Deserts can experience flooding, because the hard soil cannot absorb rainwater, leading to flash floods, the most common form of flooding.

Myth: I don’t need flood insurance if I can get disaster assistance from FEMA.
Fact: A flooding incident must be declared a federal disaster by the president before FEMA assistance becomes available. Federal disaster declarations are issued in less than 50% of all flooding events. Even then, it would be a low interest loan that would need to be repaid. Any grants that may be provided are not enough to cover all losses, and you would be in line with everyone else. In reality, I wouldn’t count on FEMA assistance.

Fact: A flood or flash flood can happen in all 50 states in the U.S. and can happen at any time of the year. We all live in a flood zone.

Fact: It only takes 6 inches of moving floodwater to knock a person down and only 2 feet of moving water to carry your car away.

Fact: Flash floods can have walls of water 10 to 15 feet high.

Fact: The most common natural disaster in the U.S. is flooding.

Fact: Flood water may carry sewage, harmful microorganisms, sharp objects and other debris that are a danger to your health. You should never walk or swim in flood water.

Fact: Flooding is a “Top 5” cause of U.S. weather-related deaths. According to NOAA, in the 30- year span from 1994-2013, floods resulted in higher average fatalities than tornados, lightning and even hurricanes.